Filling in the Black Gum Gaps

Woodend Landcare has recently completed our $6650 Victorian Government Communities Volunteer Action Grant. This funding opportunity came at a important moment – Woodend Landcare had just overseen the removal of the majority of willow along Five Mile Creek from Romsey Rd to the Children’s Park in Woodend and we were ready to revegetate the sites with the endangered Black Gum and associated native understorey species.

Black Gum (Eucalypus aggregata) is endangered at a state level and is listed in the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1989. In 2015 it was also recommended for listing as ‘Vulnerable’ on the EPBC Act. In Victoria, the species only occurs in a 4 km radius of Woodend. Its limited geographic range makes it highly vulnerable further loss. Hence, the protection of the black gums is a major goal for Woodend Landcare. Our focus for action for this grant was along the Five Mile Creek where Black Gum remains as isolated trees.

Eight working bees and five planting days later, some 1000 new seedlings are now in place along the banks of Five Mile Creek and any regrowth of willow or blackberry has been treated. The Ruby Mckenzie Park sites saw us plant threatened Black Gum trees into an area previously covered by willow and other weeds. We also added essential understorey species to our previous planting s between Pyke and Bowen St. Just as importantly, some 257 participants attended these events to make it happen – not to mention all the behind the scenes work preparing for and promoting the planting days, organising contractors, and ordering plants and hardware. A mammoth effort by some very dedicated volunteers – estimated to at least an $23,130 in-kind contribution to the project.

To remove the majority of willows, many hawthorns, most of the blackberries and other woody weeds infestations from this part of the creek in three years is quite an achievement. It would have been impossible without the huge volunteer contribution and grant money to pay for the various contractors, materials and plants needed along the way. Our huge thanks goes out to everyone who has been involved in the project and to the Victorian Government for making these funding opportunities available.

David Gossip’s highlight of the project was Dave Bower finding his pocket knife still in good condition after being lost five or more years ago!

First working bee for 2018

Our 2018 series of working bees kicks off on Friday the 2nd of February with our traditional  twilight bee followed by a BBQ at the Children’s Park. Always a delightful evening – do join us! More details to come in the new year.

News from our neighbours: Newham Landcare

CLICK HERE to view Newham Landcare’s latest news. Features a great article about turning your dam into habitat, and another about climate change and biodiversity.

News from the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network

CLICK HERE to view the latest news from UCLN. Features:

  • CITIZEN SCIENCE PROJECT UNDERWAY FOR UCLN
  • KYNETON SECONDARY COLLEGE STUDENTS WIN RESOURCE SMART SCHOOLS AWARD
  • EAGLES MONITORED BY PIPERS CREEK LANDCARE
  • UCLN BIOLINK PROJECT UPDATE
  • THE WILDFLOWER WHISPERER AT NEWHAM HALL.
  • NEW VICTORIAN BIODIVERSITY ATLAS APP
  • JUVENILE BARKING OWL STEALS THE SHOW
  • CONTRIBUTE TO THE HEPBURN SHIRE COUNCIL BIODIVERSITY STRATEGY
  • SUCCESSFUL COLLABORATION AT METCALFE
  • KYNETON SHOW
  • RABBIT UPDATE
  • EVENTS
  • GRANTS, NEWS AND RESOURCES

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